mathieu tremblin and colleague finish up a work of art

The Artist who Makes the Illegible Legible: Meet Mathieu Tremblin

Graffiti is one area of street art that appears to divide feeling the most. The issue of whether it’s art or not is one which we’ve all been involved in.

Yet when it comes to tagging, the vast majority would likely concur that it’s the most repulsive sort of street art. And, what’s significantly more irritating is that it’s quite often illegible. But there’s one man who takes the ugly pieces and transforms them into beautiful, legible artwork.

The name is Mathieu Tremblin. Based out of two diverse French urban cities, Rennes and Arles, Tremblin has an inconspicuous method of making people think somewhat harder.

Style

Tremblin’s work concentrates on issues of ordinary city life, branding and graffiti society. He believes that these pressing issues are best communicated through urban interventions. His pieces figure out how to emerge in Europe’s swarmed graffiti scene, with his greatest works featuring a minimalist look at first impression, just to uncover testing, however, energetic goes up against city culture.

Works and Ideologies

Most of his art can be seen in his two French hometowns. There, he collaborates with his accomplice in the art scene “Ripoulain” and with photography collective “BIP”. His work can also be found in the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany.

Project Tag Clouds was born out of Tremblin’s understanding as a street artist. He used to be a tagger and felt the name composing graffiti and particularly tagging, is the ground premise of self-expression in an urban space.

project tag clouds showcasing graffiti repurposed

The artist discovers graffiti tags on buildings, highway underpasses in French towns and garage doors. He lists them, erases them and re-paints them in clear, digital-style typeface – Arial, Times New Roman, Helvetica or Georgia. Tag Clouds is about uncovering that tagging on the chance that you follow and read it; it’s an approach to go through the city in a new perspective.

By using digital typeface, Tremblin doesn’t just make the words neat-regardless of the possibility that they don’t appear to bode well-but additionally makes likenesses to ‘word clouds’ found online, considering on the contrast amongst advanced and physical tags.

mathieu tremblin project tag clouds graffiti turned street art

Tremblin’s interventions are a celebration of graffiti tags rather than a critique. Random graffiti writing used to be viewed as the ugly art in the city but Tag Clouds is out to make a tribute to random writing so that individuals accepts its visual presence by reading it.

Mathieu believes street art tagging is a reaction to an undeniably ‘consumerist space’ in urban areas, brimming with advertising on every surface. And that according to him diminishes the individual articulation of residents to a matter of decision between brands.

project tag clouds by mathieu tremblin

Tremblin’s art continues to inspire many cities, appearing as analysis on a particular point as examined in his work. His work makes a city more energetic, poetic and open to appointment. He’s still open to the idea that can notice and destroy his work since vandalism is in itself an approach to make destructive conversation. Hope you’ll love and appreciate his work, though.

'untitled' kirsten mccrea mural at up here

How UP Here Festival Transformed Sudbury

In August 2016, Up Here made a comeback to Sudbury, Canada with the aim of rebranding the city. The pollution-stricken downtown city of Canada had long been the centre of criticism from outsiders and Up Here was out to refine that notion. A city formerly nicknamed ‘the asshole of Canada’ by the locals was set to become the happiest city in Canada.

Up Here landed in Sudbury already rebranded after their original name, Up Fest was found to infringe on another street art festival from the UK. That was a blow to their Sudbury’s festival event which was much about muralists, musicians and artists, but they still nailed it. To add the icing on the cake, Up Here even launched a mobile app thanks to their shrewd graphic designers and marketers Andrew Knapp and Christian Pelletier.

"you are beautiful" mural from sudbury's up here festival

There were about 16 Up Here’s commissioned murals which were part of the plan of transforming Sudbury and change the perception of the city. Pelletier’s ambition was to make Sudbury a destination for art enthusiasts by turning the city’s downtown to an urban art gallery. The plan involved inviting artists from around Sudbury and across the world to create big murals.

2016’s event rocked with big stage artists, with the likes of Ella and Pitr, Kirsten McCrea, Ola Volo, James Kirkpatrick and Hobz leaving marks of jaw-dropping murals.

'god helmet' mural on Science North building rooftop

The mural at the Science North rooftop is especially breathtaking. Done by French artists Ella and Pitr’, the piece is of great significance to Sudbury as it put the city on the international stage. The mural features a sleeping giant and it’s visible via Google maps. Many people from around the world hunt for Ella and Pitr’s murals all over the internet trying to find the different pieces in Chile and Portugal. And now Sudbury was added into the game. That’s why it matters to the people of this city.

'untitled' mural by kirsten mccrea at up here festival in sudbury

 

The musical offerings at last year’s fest put the focus on female-fronted bands with U.S Girls, Young Galaxy, Dilly Dally and Stars making the headlines. Locals Neli Nenkova and Tracy Baker also made to the podium. People had tough decisions to make. Pelletier called the festival ‘dueling late nights’ which put two bands against each other at different venues. Some hip hop acts were also on the roster as Pelletier was of the idea of diversifying the program in all senses.

up here mural by krueger krew

He also didn’t forget about the fun and creativity for kids. They organized a family day and kids from within Sudbury had a blast of 2016. Kids did face-painting on adults as well as painting mini-murals on cardboards. The organizers believed there’s no better way of gentrifying the city than getting everyone engaged and celebrating the move together.

whos going to take the weight mural from up here mural festival in sudbury

By the time the fest was over, Sudbury was lit by life-worthy elements. It looked renovated with beauty oozing from all corners of the city. Pelletier said last year’s theme was based on terraformation, which according to him is making an inhabitable space livable. They are proud of that achievement.

ostendstrasse frankfurt germany mural in subway (aka metro) tunnel

Ostendstrasse Metro Mural – 6,600 m2 Mural in Frankfurt, Germany

Murals have the power to transform a community. They unite people and teach them about their culture plus their origins. Issues like inequality, violence, unemployment among others are well expressed by murals because of the long-lasting effect. It’s hard to ignore a large painting on a wall somewhere in the street even if it’s been there for many days. And, you somehow realize something new about it every time you see it.

The tunnel in Ostendstrasse metro station in Frankfurt was once considered a dangerous place to wait for a train. The walls were covered in dirt and the area wasn’t bright enough.

Enter Case Maclaim and Does. The two artists combined to create a 6.600 m2 mural in the tunnel. They spent six weeks underground and gave the city a masterpiece. The work began with cleaning the walls which were the major challenge of the project. Not like the dirt was an issue but because the tunnel was not equipped with a system that could allow large amounts of water.

frankfurt mural

Nonetheless, Case and Does had the extra manpower for assistance. They moved in a 1.5-ton compressor that removed grime with dry ice. The walls were then prepared in one color coating which consumed 1,000 liters of paint. They used green as the base color because of its crisp effect. Green also gives a sense of growth, rejuvenation and energy, perhaps what they intended for the people.

frankfurt tunnel mural

The artists followed by applying their designs on the primed walls. They added 2 more color palettes resulting in an awe-inspiring art that span every inch of the wall. Ostendstrasse metro station is now a go-to place for everyone visiting Frankfurt. Many people flock the station for public meetings, take photographs and witness the piece of art.

Case Maclaim Bio

Born Andreas von Chrzanowski, CASE is a German graffiti artist. Case began his work back in 1995 painting with spray cans to create photorealistic graffiti. His style features body shape representations and photorealistic arts. Some of his artistry usually portrays people or the human body. He takes them from their natural form and displays them in a new context often with animalistic, monstrous and mythic elements.

Most of his incredible works can be seen on several walls across Europe. From London to Wroclaw, Seville, Milano and Moscow, Case has caused waves in the international art arena. He has also painted walls in Mexico, New York and Los Angeles. He has been doing projects since 2008 and the Frankfurt painting is a tip of the iceberg.

About Does

Joos van Barneveld aka DOES is a Dutch artist known for his pure style, eye for detail and balanced color palettes. Born in 1982 in The Netherlands, he started crafting in 1997. His talent and years of experience have raised him to international artistry.

His works have featured in several exhibitions around the world. Does works includes prints, illustrative drawings, canvasses and murals. He likes to breathe brightness, dynamism and energy in his art. The Ostendstrasse wall graffiti sums it all.

Thank you Case and Does for breathing new life to Ostendstrasse metro station.